Maui: the case for car camping

I now belong to a small community of travel hacking enthusiasts, and you wouldn’t believe the glamorous hotels they stay in for free or nearly free. A great recent example is Michael’s recent post on a trip to Japan. I guess you could say I’m on the opposite end of that spectrum, and I’m here to make the case today for car camping on Maui, as I did on my trip there in February.

But why

Maui has all of its resorts on one side of the island and everything else worth seeing spread through the rest of the island. And it’s not Oahu — the roads are in parts windy, single lane, treacherous and made of dirt. Driving the famous Road to Hana takes about 3 hours, and I’m not even sure Hana itself has hotels. It barely has a supermarket — just a liquor/convenience store.

There are beaches with well-maintained public restrooms everywhere, and no one cares where you camp as long as it isn’t under a “no camping” sign.

There’s no temptation to retreat to the hotel room you’re overpaying for. You’ll never miss a sunset.

Without the rush to get here or there before dark, you’ll have the opportunity to stop at BBQ stands like this one on the road to Hana:

(With food served on a leaf, and chopsticks whittled from bamboo)

There are also great “official” campgrounds, like the one at Wai’anapanapa State Park (the black sand beach) that’s only $18 per night for up to 6 people.

Another good one is at Haleakala National Park — free with park entrance fees. It’s the best way to beat the crowd to see the sunrise, since you’ll be just 45 minutes or so from the peak.

But mostly, I’d love to encourage you to take the drive to Maui’s Upcountry. True, there isn’t much there except open fields and windmills, but it’s worth it. I’m no photographer, and I took these with a phone camera, but Upcountry is breathtaking:

Car camping will also encourage you to explore all the beaches, rather than going to the same one outside your hotel for your entire vacation. These other beaches will probably be less crowded, too.

When considering this, I tried to look for encouragement online — any evidence that someone had done this and had a good time. I didn’t find it. Let me be yours. If you are the type of traveler that doesn’t spend much time in your hotel room, if you don’t have a complicated beauty regimen, if you’re up for an adventure and seeing parts of Maui that are more for the locals, you’ll probably like car camping.

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